Rare Rides: The 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, a Paragon of Reliability

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

We’ve got a special treat for you today — this glorious Aston Martin Lagonda from that future dystopia now long past, 1984. And futuristic it was, when you consider this car was sprawled across luxuriously carpeted showrooms beginning in 1976.

So let’s go back in time. Is your leisure suit ready?

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

The Lagonda you see here is not the original Lagonda design. You see, that version was based on a contemporary DBS and was announced at the 1974 London Motor Show. Now known as the Series 1 Lagonda, that model is extremely rare, with a production run of just seven cars. If you find a ’74 or ’75 Lagonda, do let us know.

What we have here is a Series 2, which is the Lagonda most people think of when they hear the name. On offer from 1976 through 1985, production delays meant customers did not receive deliveries until 1979. Poor show, Aston.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

The only engine available is this carbureted 5.3-liter V8, generating 280 horsepower. So, basically the same as a General Motors LS V8, right? Top speed was 143 miles per hour, and 0-60 mph happened in 8.8 seconds. Most impressive.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

The interior of the Lagonda featured the sort of creamy cowhides and deep pile carpets expected in a British vehicle of this class. And customers had a right to their high expectations, as the asking price in 1980 for a Lagonda was £49,933, or $116,090 USD. The CPI Inflation Calculator tells me that’s $364,897 today. But you were getting quite a lot of car for the money.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

Overall exterior length is a generous 207.9 inches (about a foot shorter than period American large sedans), but you wouldn’t know it looking at the rear passenger area. At least those close quarters give a better view of all that hand-stitched navy piping.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

The door panels are thick walnut-and-leather affairs, and one would imagine a bank vault-type noise is assured.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

The rear solarium area is covered with retractable netting — a feature the Chevrolet Malibu Maxx would copy years later.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

Something you might not expect in such a vintage automobile: all gauges are electronic. The Lagonda was the first production vehicle in the world to use computer management and an all-digital instrument panel.

Image: 1984 Aston Martin Lagonda, image via Hemmings

And none of what you see here was reliable. The electronics development alone would wind up costing four times the entire budget for the project. Aston Martin recognized the flaw and, for the Series 3 (1986-1987), replaced the LED system with even less reliable cathode ray tubes. Not keen to give up on the name, the automaker’s Series 4 Lagonda ran from 1987 through 1990, with 104 examples made.

Our subject today is currently for sale through Hemmings, with an asking price of $64,900. Compared to the initial asking price, that’s a complete steal.

[Images: Hemmings]